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  • How To Choose the Right Keto Protein Powder | Buddy Nutrition

  • Committing to a keto or low-carb diet can be difficult — and on top of avoiding unhealthy snacking, trying to squeeze in the right amount of protein can be difficult. If you’re looking to maximize the effects of your workout, combat unhealthy snacking and improve muscle tone without cheating on your keto diet, we’ve got you covered.

    Here’s everything you need to know to choose a protein powder to complement your ketogenic and low-carb lifestyle.

    Protein Powder Can Elevate Your Keto Wellness Goals

    You’re a keto follower and you’re always searching for the best lean protein sources. You know how to find lean protein from foods, but protein powders could be the secret wellness weapon you’re looking for.

    Protein powders are amazing for your keto lifestyle because they can help you achieve:

    • Enhanced muscle tone. Protein powders help increase muscle thickness when added to resistance training.
    • Faster metabolism. Muscle burns more calories than fat, and because protein helps build muscle, we know protein powders can help increase your metabolism. This is handy to help you achieve a healthy weight.
    • Healthy weight management. Protein powders help fill you up in a healthy way, and they reduce ghrelin, the hormone that stimulates your appetite and makes you feel hungry. As any keto fan knows, protein helps you stay full between meals. This prevents us from relying on on-the-go snack choices, which are usually the most unhealthy options.

    How to Choose The Right Keto & Low Carb Protein Powder

    Not all protein powders are the same, and even protein powders from the same source can have different carb contents. As an example, whey protein comes in two common forms: whey protein isolate and whey protein concentrate. While they’re both whey proteins, they’re made differently, and their carbohydrate concentration is very different.

    So how do you choose the right protein for your diet? Read on to discover a few of the best options for your unique needs.

    Best Low-Carb Protein Powder: Whey Protein Isolate

    If you’re watching your waistline and looking for the lowest fat and carb protein powder, whey protein isolate is for you. It’s as low-carb as you can get, has zero fat and even contains slightly more protein per serving than whey concentrate. Whey protein concentrate contains about 3.5 grams of carbohydrate per 100-gram serving while whey protein isolate contains up to 1 gram for the same serving.

    Top tip: Whey protein isolate may not suit your wellness goals if you’re looking for whole-body nourishment. To get its carb content so low, whey protein isolate is heavily processed, which means some of the goodies from whey like bioactive peptides and immunoglobulins are removed in the refining process. Peptides are important building blocks of collagen in your skin, hair, tendons and nails. Peptides also can do plenty of antioxidant and antimicrobial activities and decrease your risk of hypertension and diabetes. Immunoglobulins are vital to your immune response.

    If holistic wellness is just as important to you as your keto diet, choose another low-carb protein powder. Some options are below.

    Best Keto Protein Powder: Egg Protein

    As a keto fan, you know eggs are one of the most nutritious parts of your diet, and egg protein powders are no exception. Whole egg protein powders are a great source of vitamins and macronutrients, plus they’re very low in carbohydrates. Whole egg powders contain all the goodies found in both the egg white and yolk, including selenium; vitamins D, B6 and B12; and important minerals such as zinc, iron and copper.

    Egg whites have a high concentration of protein without all the fat and cholesterol of the egg yolk. For keto lovers, this makes egg white protein powder a powerful way to harness the nutrition of egg protein without the extra fat. It helps you stay fuller for longer, preventing between-meal snacking and optimizing your workout goals.

    Best Keto Protein Powder for Vegetarians and Vegans

    Whey is derived from milk and eggs are, of course, not vegan. Don’t worry though, plant-based protein powders have a lot to offer to complement your keto diet. Here are our top picks:

    Pea Protein Isolate

    Derived from yellow peas, pea protein isolate is a powerful source of keto-friendly protein. As a complete protein, it contains all nine essential amino acids your body needs to build connective tissue and structures within the body. In other words, it’s vegan and amazing at helping you achieve your wellness goals.

    Pea protein is also a great weight-management tool. You know how full you feel after eating dahl? Pea protein is full of iron and protein, helping you feel fuller for longer so you don’t snack between meals. This works to help you stick to your keto diet, plus it helps you achieve your weight-loss goals.

    Rice Protein Isolate

    If you’re on the keto diet but you’re also gluten-free and soy-free, finding exceptional protein powders is hard. Rice protein isolate is an easy source of protein that’s both vegetarian and gut-friendly for those with dietary requirements. Don’t think rice protein isn’t as powerful as the others either. It’s high in methionine, which is a handy essential amino acid that helps with the growth of tissues, including hair, nails, skin and muscle.

    Final Thoughts

    Finding the best low-carb protein powder is all about deciding what’s right for you and your unique wellness goals. But what if you’re still not sure what type of protein will both meet your dietary needs and help you achieve your fitness goals? That’s where Buddy Nutrition comes in.

    We believe that your protein powder should be as unique as you are! That’s why each and every bag of our high-quality protein is formulated with a specific blend of protein powders, boosts and flavors tailored exactly to you. Ready to find your workout buddy? Take the questionnaire today!

    Sources:

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25628520/

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4258944/

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24801369/https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S096399691500031